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Here in NJ today they said we would get a coating of snow. Figured I could make it to my college class in the Shelby. Got halfway there when it was starting to stick to the road and turned around couldn't even make it up small hills or drive in a straight line on a flat surface, max I could do was 12 mph with my hazards on and people were still beeping at me which I just couldn't understand. I do not think people actually understand how hard it is to drive these types of cars in the snow. I would spin the tires just letting off the clutch with no gas. Got about 10 minutes from the house there had to have been 2-3 inches on the ground by then and a car stopped in front of me on a hill. I think you know where this is going... I was stuck in the middle of busy road. Called the non-emgerncy dispatch told me all their officers were out on other calls like that and they would get to me when they could. About 45 minutes later 2 squad cars roll up block traffic both ways and push me into the abandoned gas station I was right next to when I got stuck. I'm no expert at driving yet, I've had my license since I was 17 and I am now 22, so I'm just curious if anyone else drove in the snow with the 350, on the Michelin tires that is. At this point in time I feel extremely foolish, as this time last year I had just bought a 2017 Ford Raptor because I figured the hellcat I had at the time would be terrible in the snow so I traded it in for the raptor, and the raptor blew though everything no problem I never worried at all.Spring rolled around and I wanted a sports car again since winter was over so I traded in my raptor for a new 350, I thought stick would be better in the snow if it snowed but after today I'm not sure anymore. I feel terrible right now as I had to leave my car at an abandoned gas station and get an uber home. I know its my fault for going out when they said it was going to snow, but a coating I can handle and its not a coating , nor could I afford to miss the midterm that was scheduled for today since my prof did not cancel class. But a quick email that pretty much explained that race car is life and it doesn't do snow well and I'm off the hook and don't have to go.
 

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Sooo... Just out of curiosity, do you know you're not supposed to run the supersports under 45 degrees due to loss of traction; and under 40 due to risk of the tires cracking? Judging by the fact the snow was sticking to the road, I'm going to go out on a limb and assume it was well under 40 degrees. These are high performance SUMMER tires, not all seasons. If you want to drive your shelby through the cold and light snow then I highly suggest you get a set of high performance all seasons or winter tires. Pirelli has a decent selection of both. You're pretty lucky you didn't smash up your car of someone else's. Live and learn.
 

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Here in NJ today they said we would get a coating of snow. Figured I could make it to my college class in the Shelby. Got halfway there when it was starting to stick to the road and turned around couldn't even make it up small hills or drive in a straight line on a flat surface, max I could do was 12 mph with my hazards on and people were still beeping at me which I just couldn't understand. I do not think people actually understand how hard it is to drive these types of cars in the snow. I would spin the tires just letting off the clutch with no gas. Got about 10 minutes from the house there had to have been 2-3 inches on the ground by then and a car stopped in front of me on a hill. I think you know where this is going... I was stuck in the middle of busy road. Called the non-emgerncy dispatch told me all their officers were out on other calls like that and they would get to me when they could. About 45 minutes later 2 squad cars roll up block traffic both ways and push me into the abandoned gas station I was right next to when I got stuck. I'm no expert at driving yet, I've had my license since I was 17 and I am now 22, so I'm just curious if anyone else drove in the snow with the 350, on the Michelin tires that is. At this point in time I feel extremely foolish, as this time last year I had just bought a 2017 Ford Raptor because I figured the hellcat I had at the time would be terrible in the snow so I traded it in for the raptor, and the raptor blew though everything no problem I never worried at all.Spring rolled around and I wanted a sports car again since winter was over so I traded in my raptor for a new 350, I thought stick would be better in the snow if it snowed but after today I'm not sure anymore. I feel terrible right now as I had to leave my car at an abandoned gas station and get an uber home. I know its my fault for going out when they said it was going to snow, but a coating I can handle and its not a coating , nor could I afford to miss the midterm that was scheduled for today since my prof did not cancel glass. But a quick email that pretty much explained that race car is life and it doesn't do snow well and I'm off the hook and don't have to go.
I'm old enough to be your grandfather, so forgive my judgmental attitude. You're twenty-two years old, driving a 526 horsepower, world-class sports car, and you've likely studied and memorized every high performance factoid about the GT350, not to mention its competitors, and you have no clue about the absolute danger of driving maximum performance SUMMER tires in the snow???

You, my young friend deserve the proverbial whack on the back of your head.

Stop driving your Shelby with its current tires on snow right now. You are a danger to yourself and others on the road.

Do yorself a favour and reaearch winter tires on Tirerack.com. Find some appropriate winter tires, and if you believe you can't afford winter tires, then you can't afford to drive the Shelby.

Seriously.

And please note I'm pontificating from Canada, so my ranting is based on 5 decades of REAL winter driving.

Please, stay safe.

Tim
Edmonton, Alberta
 

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I'm old enough to be your grandfather, so forgive my judgmental attitude. You're twenty-two years old, driving a 526 horsepower, world-class sports car, and you've likely studied and memorized every high performance factoid about the GT350, not to mention its competitors, and you have no clue about the absolute danger of driving maximum performance SUMMER tires in the snow???

You, my young friend deserve the proverbial whack on the back of your head.

Stop driving your Shelby with its current tires on snow right now. You are a danger to yourself and others on the road.

Do yorself a favour and reaearch winter tires on Tirerack.com. Find some appropriate winter tires, and if you believe you can't afford winter tires, then you can't afford to drive the Shelby.

Seriously.

And please note I'm pontificating from Canada, so my ranting is based on 5 decades of REAL winter driving.

Please, stay safe.

Tim
Edmonton, Alberta

I can't stop laughing. I mean no disrespect, everyone learns their lessons in their own ways. I am no exception...but...SNOW???? Tim can be grandfather and I can be grandmother...lol I've lived through Alaska winters.

I've often wondered about the kids that manage to swing the payments for this finicky machine and have no real clue what lies beyond. There are so many high performance parts in this car that if this is your first real high performance "race" car, you should read your manual from front to back more than once and possibly take some classes. Exposure to so many different conditions need to be understood before you just jump in and drive.

Heat, cold, rain, etc. are all things this car can handle but you need to know the limits. Like the tire ratings Mike listed above, extreme temps will damage high performance parts. You can drive in the rain but there is a limit. Even a somewhat shallow puddle can damage this car.

I highly urge you to really read up on every aspect of this car soon. I also recommend you never have a car like this without having alternate transportation. A couple of winters ago, my husband managed to wreck his 4 x 4 Toyota FJ Cruiser in the snow and he was driving carefully and respectful of the weather.

Please take no offense. We offer our wisdom and advice. (And in Tim's case, a cyber proverbial whack on the back of your head :p)

Glad no one was hurt and as always, stay safe!
Christine
 

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Hello Voodo thanks for being forthcoming and truly a honest question and posting. Believe it or not I can relate with your frustration since back in 2003 I purchased my wife a brand new Volkswagen Toureag with the 19 inch wheel package. And back in 2003 the 19 inch wheel was a big deal. The selling dealer sells me a German car with Summer tires unbeknownst to me until winter arrives. My wife calls me when she is leaving to work on a light snow 1-2 inch at best in our driveway. She says the car won’t move and I am like no fricking way it’s AWD and she is adamant about it and tell her to grab my truck and go. I get home later and sure enough the car just spins. To make a long story short I had to buy all new aftermarket wheels since at that time in 2003 the all season tire for the 19s didn’t exist. So here’s a link and I just may do the same on my car as well and hope this helps:
[video=youtube_share;sANeCyj1hAk]https://youtu.be/sANeCyj1hAk[/video]
 

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Wow !! I could not even imagine having to take the GT 350 in snow. Years and years ago I had something similar happen with a 1988 IROC Z Camaro. That was old school (no abs or traction control) and all white knuckle
 

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Facebook Twitter Pinterest Mail TIRE TECH: DON'T DRIVE SUMMER PERFORMANCE TIRES IN COLD TEMPERATURES
Whether you blame it on climate change, a polar vortex or what seems to be the beginning of the next ice age, there's no doubt recent weather patterns have exposed many drivers to freezing temperatures and wintery driving conditions. In anticipation of the next time Mother Nature extends her cold reach, drivers with vehicles equipped with summer performance tires need to know those tires are not designed for near- or below-freezing temperatures on clear roads, nor in slush, snow and ice.

When faced with near- and below-freezing temperatures, drivers should leave their summer performance tire-equipped vehicle at home and drive a vehicle equipped with all-season or winter tires.

Summer performance tires feature tread compounds engineered to provide traction in warm to hot ambient temperatures. They were never intended to experience near- and below-freezing temperatures, nor the wintry driving conditions that often accompany them.

As ambient temperatures get colder, typically in the 40-45° Fahrenheit range, summer performance tires lose a noticeable percentage of traction as their tread compound rubber properties change from a pliable elastic to inflexible plastic. The tire industry uses the term "glass transition" to describe the temperature where a summer performance tire's grip/slip performance changes dramatically. This means the summer performance tires that provide predictable traction in warm to hot conditions will be found to be very challenging to drive in cold to freezing temperatures. This is especially true when the tires first begin to be driven or if the driver aggressively applies gas pedal pressure with today's turbocharged fours or high-torque sixes and eights. Fortunately, glass transition is a reversible condition that allows the tires' normal traction to return as the ambient temperatures climb.

If ambient temperatures drop to near- or below-freezing, driving or rolling a vehicle equipped with summer performance tires risks the possibility of tread compound cracking. Tread compound cracking is a permanent condition that requires the tires to be replaced. The other condition that can be caused by running summer performance tires in cold temperatures is the possibility of chipping away the edges of the tread blocks.

Since both of these conditions only occur as the result of what's considered improper use or storage, they are not typically covered by the manufacturer's warranty.
 

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Iceage,

Thanks for posting this valuable high performance summer tire information.

It's my opinion the vast majority of sports car owners aren't aware of the limitations of summer, performance rubber, and how cold temperatures seriously degrades the 'grippability' of tires designed for maximum traction on pavement in warm to hot temperatures.

Most car enthusiasts like the members on this forum are also unaware of of the potential physical damage of cracking the rubber to high performance summer tires as the result of using the tires in cold weather.

I think that lack of knowledge is simply because many owners live in warmer climes and don't normally have to deal with the issue, and maximum performance tire rubber technology has advanced so much in the past few years, rubber cracking due to cold weather use is a relatively new phenomenon.

Having said that, thanks again for posting the excellent technical explanation and reminder on why summer tires are designed for summer use only, and when it gets cold or (dread the thought) when the snow flies like it is here in Western Canada, to park our beasts or fit them with appropriate rubber.

Tim
 

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This same conversation is going on in the Hellcat.org forum and it’s good info for all and for me today living in Northern a Virginia I prepped my cars for the winter. After watching the Video above on the winter tire set up I came to closure to pass and just park my Mustang. I own the Ford Focus RS as well and Ford definelty did it right with the RS winter wheel and tire option package which my car has. I changed out the Summer performance tires today and installed the Winter wheels and tires. I purchased spray on removable Black paint and unfortunately waited too long to apply. The paint needs to be applied when it’s 65-80 degrees. Oh well hopefully will have a warm spell lol and I can paint them cause nit excited about the Silver wheels. But at least I can still drive her in the winter. Unlike my GT350 is for the most part parked now in my car hauler for ahwile until it warms up and or I take her to Florida. Here’s some pics from the project and the thread from Helkcat.org which I am still very active there even though I don’t have my Hellcats anymore.
https://www.hellcat.org/threads/cat-in-the-cold-with-pirelli-p-zeros.221079/#post-3927301
 

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Iceage,

Thanks for posting this valuable high performance summer tire information.

It's my opinion the vast majority of sports car owners aren't aware of the limitations of summer, performance rubber, and how cold temperatures seriously degrades the 'grippability' of tires designed for maximum traction on pavement in warm to hot temperatures.

Most car enthusiasts like the members on this forum are also unaware of of the potential physical damage of cracking the rubber to high performance summer tires as the result of using the tires in cold weather.

I think that lack of knowledge is simply because many owners live in warmer climes and don't normally have to deal with the issue, and maximum performance tire rubber technology has advanced so much in the past few years, rubber cracking due to cold weather use is a relatively new phenomenon.

Having said that, thanks again for posting the excellent technical explanation and reminder on why summer tires are designed for summer use only, and when it gets cold or (dread the thought) when the snow flies like it is here in Western Canada, to park our beasts or fit them with appropriate rubber.

Tim
Cars like ours (and ever car I've ever bought new for that matter) come with a lovely tire supplement that has this kind of info in it. Unfortunately, most owners toss it in the glovebox, never to be seen again and never actually read it. I've had the pleasure of seeing a dealership destroy 4 tires on a brand new Z06 because they moved the car 4 feet in sub-freezing temps, so I do well to mind the temps before I take my car out of the garage in the morning.
 

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Not to flog a dead horse or preach to the choir on this topic, but the December issue of Car and Driver just arrived.

It has is an excellent feature article comparing summer and winter tire performance using a Corvette Grand Sport and Porsche Carrera RWD.

For all of you curious about braking, acceleration and lap time differences between summer tires and winter tires on snow, this is a very informative article.

Tim
 

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By the way, if you want snow tires for your stock GT350 wheels, I had a bit of back and forth with the Ford Performance Info Center, the recommendation they ended with was the following. I used them all through last winter in New England.

Bridgestone Blizzaks
255/40/19 FRONT
275/40/19 REAR
 

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Pretty solid on those tires. It's all windy roads in a forest near me. Slight slide on the back end on ice once turning right at a crossroads at 5mph but just let it correct and was fine. Use the snow/ice setting when it's really wet or snow/ice. You can feel the difference if you play with it - damps the throttle quite significantly, stops you putting your foot down and losing traction.

Regular driving at highway speeds don't notice much difference - mainly it's less subject to tracking/pulling on the steering wheel on uneven roads than the summer tires.
 
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