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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wondering how common this particular cooling system failure is.

Here's the Executive Summary: The engine part that Ford refers to as the "Water Outlet" (Ford FR3Z-8592-A) has a pressed-in nipple which is used to connect the coolant return line to the expansion tank. The nipple came out of the Water Outlet and was spraying coolant up towards the hood.

I was fortunate to have this occur at the end of our second track day at Oregon Raceway Park. About 15 of us had rented the track for two days and had it all to ourselves. No Sessions or Groups - just go out and drive as much as you want! I took full advantage of the opportunity. I consumed over half the life of my brand new Falken RT660 tires.

The failure occurred as I was completing my last hot lap as our track was about to go cold for the day when I saw and smelled coolant erupting from the hood. I quick check of the gauges showed the engine temp was normal for the conditions - which is slightly elevated - but found nothing else amiss. Fortunately, I was two turns from the pit entry. I idled quickly into the pits and up to my paddock spot. This is the exact scenario for which I purchased a trailer and installed a winch.

Due to the sun shining directly on the engine bay, the brightly illuminated surface made it difficult to peer deeper into the dark engine bay to see where the leak occurred. It didn't matter right then as the track day was over anyway. I loaded up and towed the car home the next day.

Once I got decent light on the engine, it became clear that the heater hose had become disconnected from the Water Outlet. I purchased a replacement Water Outlet from Ford and could have fixed it myself, but the car is still under warranty, so I decided to let my dealership repair it including the new coolant and pressure testing. I also wondered if they might find anything else that may have contributed to the fail.

The dealership just called and said they found nothing else amiss. I should get the car back later today.

I searched the forums and found one other thread discussing this issue which contained the suggestion to replace the pressed-in stud with a screw-in type. If this fail happens again, I will explore this screw-in option further.

Sewing machine Automotive tire Machine tool Gas Motor vehicle


Gas Auto part Metal Cylinder Fastener
 

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2019 GT350 Shadow Black/White Stripes
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I had the similar part go on my 2016 F150. It started leaking right at the water outlet. Seems to be a very poor design to have any type of press fitting, and snap on fitting(radiator hose) for the coolant system.
 

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How did hte RT660's hold up at the track? I heard they are great Autocross tires, but not real good on a track just because they build heat so quick.

I was considering 660's next and going to 18's with 315 square set up. I am looking for real world feedback on the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How did the RT660's hold up at the track?
In brief, I think the Falkens and Pilot Sport Cup 2 have about the same performance and longevity.

I am not terribly experienced at track driving, so I may be unable to discern the tire subtleties that others are able to. These last two days at ORP were my 10th and 11th track days. That said, here's my impressions:

I've run on Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2, Michelin Pilot Super Sport and now with the Falkens. I could tell the PSS tires had less grip than the PSC2 tires, but wore much better. (Duh!) The Falkens felt just as good as the PSC2. I was quite impressed.

Although the PSS tires had less grip, they were fun to run since you can slide the car exiting the corners. As you approach their limit, the grip loss is progressive and controllable.

As expected, the PSC2 and the Falkens have higher grip and let you get closer to the limit before they start to slide. That means there's not as much warning as they approach their limit. They are still progressive and controllable, but the transition happens faster. You need to be on your toes.

I think my set of Falkens are now about half gone after these two track days at ORP, but we did considerably more driving than I get at the commercial track days. I didn't notice any change in the Falkens performance during the sessions, including some as long as 30 minutes. But that may be my noob-ness showing. I put 279 track miles on the car over these two days. My Cup 2 tires lasted 5 track days, but I was running a tad slower on them ;)

Front camber is -2.3°. Rear camber is -1.00°. Temperature got up to the mid-70's. To give you a feel of how hard I pushed them, my best time at ORP CCW was 2:01. (Just couldn't get under that 2 minute mark!)

Here's a few photos of the Falkens:

Rear new:
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Vehicle Motor vehicle


Rear now:
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire


Front now:
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Synthetic rubber
 
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In brief, I think the Falkens and Pilot Sport Cup 2 have about the same performance and longevity.

I am not terribly experienced at track driving, so I may be unable to discern the tire subtleties that others are able to. These last two days at ORP were my 10th and 11th track days. That said, here's my impressions:

I've run on Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2, Michelin Pilot Super Sport and now with the Falkens. I could tell the PSS tires had less grip than the PSC2 tires, but wore much better. (Duh!) The Falkens felt just as good as the PSC2. I was quite impressed.

Although the PSS tires had less grip, they were fun to run since you can slide the car exiting the corners. As you approach their limit, the grip loss is progressive and controllable.

As expected, the PSC2 and the Falkens have higher grip and let you get closer to the limit before they start to slide. That means there's not as much warning as they approach their limit. They are still progressive and controllable, but the transition happens faster. You need to be on your toes.

I think my set of Falkens are now about half gone after these two track days at ORP, but we did considerably more driving than I get at the commercial track days. I didn't notice any change in the Falkens performance during the sessions, including some as long as 30 minutes. But that may be my noob-ness showing. I put 279 track miles on the car over these two days. My Cup 2 tires lasted 5 track days, but I was running a tad slower on them ;)

Front camber is -2.3°. Rear camber is -1.00°. Temperature got up to the mid-70's. To give you a feel of how hard I pushed them, my best time at ORP CCW was 2:01. (Just couldn't get under that 2 minute mark!)
Wow, great review, thanks for all the details. Are you running staggered 295/305 still? I think you pushed me over the edge on the Falkens. But another question now that you brought it up. Your front camber, are you running the factory camber plates, or aftermarket like Vorshlag? I bought my car used, and my previous owner never picked up his camber plates. I want to stay within a certain class with SCCA, but if I go to the Vorshlag, I have to change classes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am running staggered. I'm seriously considering a square 305 setup to even out the front-to-rear wear and simplify my tire management.

I bought my set of OEM Ford camber plates from a GT350R guy who wasn't interested in using his. Some say the OEM camber plates don't provide enough adjustability, so they go to the aftermarket. The track alignment settings I posted above are close to the max range of these OEM plates, There's only a bit more adjustment range remaining. With these settings, I'm getting even temperatures across the tires and a fairly even wear pattern. However, you may be able to see in the photo I posted previously, that I still have a bit more wear on the front outside edges. The outside edge is on the top in the front tire photo. Before my next track day, I'll talk with my alignment guy to see if we can increase the camber just a little more. He may have to use a thin-wall socket to make the adjustment :unsure:.

Blue Water Fluid Liquid Gas


For my first 8 track days, I ran without a track alignment - just ran the factory street settings. This includes four of the five times I was using the Cup 2 tires. After their first three track days using factory settings, the outside tire-edge wear was very apparent - almost burned through the rubber on the outside edges. I had the tires pancaked on the wheels so I could use up the rubber on the other edge. The installation of these Ford OEM plates are a huge improvement and have resolved 95% of the uneven inside/outside tire wear. I don't think the remaining small uneven wear is worth changing out the plates. However, if I hadn't installed any plates yet, I might consider the aftermarket choices. If your class restricts you to OEM, I think you'd be fine with the OEM plates.

On the track, I can't say I've noticed any difference in how the car feels with or without the plates. My track driving has (thankfully) improved over time which probably affects my perception more than driving with/without the plates.

I'm happy with these OEM plates so far. On the other hand, maybe I'm just not yet flogging my tires enough to need the aftermarket versions :cool:!
 

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I am running staggered. I'm seriously considering a square 305 setup to even out the front-to-rear wear and simplify my tire management.

I bought my set of OEM Ford camber plates from a GT350R guy who wasn't interested in using his. Some say the OEM camber plates don't provide enough adjustability, so they go to the aftermarket. The track alignment settings I posted above are close to the max range of these OEM plates, There's only a bit more adjustment range remaining. With these settings, I'm getting even temperatures across the tires and a fairly even wear pattern. However, you may be able to see in the photo I posted previously, that I still have a bit more wear on the front outside edges. The outside edge is on the top in the front tire photo. Before my next track day, I'll talk with my alignment guy to see if we can increase the camber just a little more. He may have to use a thin-wall socket to make the adjustment :unsure:.

View attachment 14025

For my first 8 track days, I ran without a track alignment - just ran the factory street settings. This includes four of the five times I was using the Cup 2 tires. After their first three track days using factory settings, the outside tire-edge wear was very apparent - almost burned through the rubber on the outside edges. I had the tires pancaked on the wheels so I could use up the rubber on the other edge. The installation of these Ford OEM plates are a huge improvement and have resolved 95% of the uneven inside/outside tire wear. I don't think the remaining small uneven wear is worth changing out the plates. However, if I hadn't installed any plates yet, I might consider the aftermarket choices. If your class restricts you to OEM, I think you'd be fine with the OEM plates.

On the track, I can't say I've noticed any difference in how the car feels with or without the plates. My track driving has (thankfully) improved over time which probably affects my perception more than driving with/without the plates.

I'm happy with these OEM plates so far. On the other hand, maybe I'm just not yet flogging my tires enough to need the aftermarket versions :cool:!
Thanks so much for the info! I am torn on what I want to do. But this is swinging me towards the Vorshlag plates, and then going aftermarket camber arms in the rear. My biggest issue is just getting the time to get under my car and seeing how everything has fit. I have heard comments that the GT350 mustang front end geometry is totally different than a regular S550, but I've not heard much about the GT350. I need to get a wheel off and just research.

I appreciate your time. I dug into your water line issue on my car just to see what it all looked like. It's hard to tell if it is just a one off, or a design flaw. Either way, thanks for putting the info out there for us to look for that rag on our cars at the track!
 

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I am wondering how common this particular cooling system failure is.

Here's the Executive Summary: The engine part that Ford refers to as the "Water Outlet" (Ford FR3Z-8592-A) has a pressed-in nipple which is used to connect the coolant return line to the expansion tank. The nipple came out of the Water Outlet and was spraying coolant up towards the hood.

I was fortunate to have this occur at the end of our second track day at Oregon Raceway Park. About 15 of us had rented the track for two days and had it all to ourselves. No Sessions or Groups - just go out and drive as much as you want! I took full advantage of the opportunity. I consumed over half the life of my brand new Falken RT660 tires.

The failure occurred as I was completing my last hot lap as our track was about to go cold for the day when I saw and smelled coolant erupting from the hood. I quick check of the gauges showed the engine temp was normal for the conditions - which is slightly elevated - but found nothing else amiss. Fortunately, I was two turns from the pit entry. I idled quickly into the pits and up to my paddock spot. This is the exact scenario for which I purchased a trailer and installed a winch.

Due to the sun shining directly on the engine bay, the brightly illuminated surface made it difficult to peer deeper into the dark engine bay to see where the leak occurred. It didn't matter right then as the track day was over anyway. I loaded up and towed the car home the next day.

Once I got decent light on the engine, it became clear that the heater hose had become disconnected from the Water Outlet. I purchased a replacement Water Outlet from Ford and could have fixed it myself, but the car is still under warranty, so I decided to let my dealership repair it including the new coolant and pressure testing. I also wondered if they might find anything else that may have contributed to the fail.

The dealership just called and said they found nothing else amiss. I should get the car back later today.

I searched the forums and found one other thread discussing this issue which contained the suggestion to replace the pressed-in stud with a screw-in type. If this fail happens again, I will explore this screw-in option further.

View attachment 13993

View attachment 13994
[I see that you have a trailer with a winch. Have you tried to utilize the winch to load the car and if so did you have any problems with the cable hutting the spoiler on the front?]
 
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